A Reznikova mystery.

Grandma Lillian’s mother Clara was a Reznikov, or Reznikova, the female version of the name. We know she came from Elisavetgrad, which was renamed Kirovograd in 1939. Clara was born about 1894, and had a much older brother named David Reznikov who was born around 1872. She also had a sister whose name we do not know, and possibly a brother named Rubin, who may have traveled to South America and was killed in a May Day parade — or so the story goes. We do not know if this is true.

Clara’s sister had four children. We think this sister (whose name could have been Minnie) died of tuberculosis in Russia. Her husband brought the four children to New York to live, where he apparently remarried and had another child. If I could find out her first name or better yet her married name, that would open up a whole new limb to the family tree, as I might be able to trace her four children: Morrie, Gertrude, Helen and Joey. Gertrude married and she and her husband went back to Russia in the 1930s for political reasons; my grandma assumes they were killed. I have a series of photographs from 1928 when Clara and at least three of her children, including my grandma Lillian, went to visit these nieces and nephews before visiting her other nephew in Rochester. This nephew was Jack Ross, the son of David Reznikov, who changed his name to Ross when he arrived in Canada. More on them soon.

There is some hint that perhaps Clara’s sister’s married name was Drubachevsky but I have never been able to trace this and do not even know where this came from. It’s my hope that one day, I will be able to find out their last name and trace the descendants of Morrie, Gertrude, Helen and Joey.

What I do have is an incredible photograph of Clara’s sister and mother along with the children. I see the family resemblance strongly in both Clara and Clara’s mother, whose bone structure is similar to mine.

Reznikova Sister + Mom
Clara Reznikova’s mother, sister and sister’s children, probably Elisavetgrad, during the nineteen-teens

 

Here are the photographs from 1928 of Clara visiting her sister’s children in New York. Do you recognize these faces?

Reznikov descendants, 1928, New York
Clara Reznikova Brodsky with her sister’s children, New York, 1928. From left: George Brodsky, Morris (last name unknown), Clara, Helen (last name unknown), Gertrude (last name unknown). Seated: Anna Brodsky, Joseph (last name unknown), Lillian (Leah) Brodsky.

 

Note: In writing this post, I have discovered that just last year, Kirovograd became Kropyvnytskyi. According to Wikipedia, Ukraine president Petro Poroshenko signed a bill “banning Communist symbols on May 15, 2015, which required places associated with communism to be renamed within a six-month period. On 25 October 2015 (during local elections) 76.6% of the Kirovohrad voters voted for renaming the city to Yelisavetgrad. A draft law currently before the Ukrainian parliament would prohibit any names associated with Russian history since the 14th century, which would make the name Yelisavetgrad inadmissible as well. A committee of the Verkhovna Rada (Ukraine’s parliament) chose the name Inhulsk on 23 December 2015. This name is a reference to the nearby Inhul river. On 31 March 2016 the State Construction, Regional Policy and Local Self-Government committee of the Verkhovna Rada recommends to parliament to rename Kirovohrad to Kropyvnytskyi. This name is a reference to writer, actor and playwright Mark Kropyvnytskyi, who was born near the city. On 14 July 2016, the name of the city was finally changed to Kropyvnytskyi.”

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Clara with child, c. 1918

This is my maternal great-grandma Clara Reznikova Brodsky, pregnant in Canada, some time in the nineteen-teens.

Here is what we know: She and my great-grandpa Abe fled the pogroms in Elizavetgrad, Russia (modern-day Ukraine) and took a boat from Germany to Canada. They settled in Hamilton, Ontario, where she gave birth to six children — three boys and three girls. One girl, Miriam, died an infant.

In this photo, she may be holding my grandma Leah; however, it was common in that era for male infants to wear gowns, so it may be one of the boys. But given Clara’s age in the photo and a gut instinct I have about that child’s face, I’d say this is Clara around 1918, holding Leah and pregnant with Annie.